Buried – Review

4 Stars

Buried is a film where, basically, nothing happens very intensely for 90 minutes. Paul Conroy (Ryan Reynolds) wakes up to find that he has been buried alive in a small wooden coffin after being taken hostage in Iraq. He soon finds a mobile phone given to him as a means of communication with his kidnapper, which he then uses to try and manufacture his rescue.

Ingeniously executed by director Rodrigo Cortés and a terrific performance from Reynolds, Buried manages to be entertaining and nail bitingly tense throughout, despite being entirely set within said coffin. All the technical aspects of the film are genius. The set itself is smart and original, using several different coffins with various sizes and separate missing walls to allow a surprisingly expansive use of shots and angles, all of which create a real and terrifying sense of claustrophobia. The lighting, from the blue glow of the mobile to the flickering flame of a lighter, sells the realism and ups the terror. As the music swells, the editing gets quicker and the tension mounts and mounts. This is a truly suspenseful film.

Buried also includes some narrative heft and interesting themes. As Conroy uses the phone to contact various individuals from those he works for to the FBI, he is exposed to corporate callousness and the complexity of international politics. These narrative moments aren’t hugely deep (unlike Conroy’s coffin) but really do add to the story.

With simplistic, yet hugely impressive technical feats, a real sense of terror, and a sprinkling of black comedy, Buried is a tight, tense film that delivers on its premise and feels genuinely original.